Ethical Consumption as a Reflexive Project: PhD Research Presentation

Last week I wrote about presenting the theoretical framework of my study at the University of Leeds’ ESSL Postgraduate Research Conference – some of the issues I talked about and key points raised in response. I also regretted about not being able to share my presentation here, but – great news! – having received my supervisor’s approval and support, I am now uploading the slides – with pleasure and anticipation of comments, feedback or just some reflection on the part of my readers.

For those well acquainted with sociological theory in general, and sociology of consumption, identity studies and structure-agency debates in particular, the slides will hopefully make perfect sense, while for those interested in food-related issues, ethics of eating and alternative food ways on a more practical level, they will probably appear too deeply theoretical. For the latter category of readers, the bibliography at the end of the presentation is intended to help you make your way through the web of sociological concepts and ideas I refer to in order to construct my approach to the ethical consumption phenomenon. Thus, Alan Warde is especially helpful in uncovering deeper sociological meanings of food and eating; Anthony Giddens’ “Modernity and Self-Identity” presents a theory of identity formation as a consumption-mediated process, and Margaret Archer’s book is a useful read for shedding some light on the perpetual structure-agency debate (although from a firm critical realist viewpoint).

Without further ado, below is the link to the presentation slides  – feedback and comments are more than welcome, but please do respect intellectual property – should you wish to further spread the slides, please do get in touch – I will be glad to help!

Ethical Consumption as a Reflexive Project: Negotiation of Consumer Identities Through Ethical Labelling

 

 

 

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One response to “Ethical Consumption as a Reflexive Project: PhD Research Presentation

  1. Pingback: Foodscapes Conference 2014: Challenging the traditional-alternative divide | ediblematters·

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